TOBY ALWAYS MAKES ME SMILE…

I love receiving emails from my dear friend Toby Salk who lives in my once-upon-a-time home of Berkeley, CA. Her email photos always bring a smile and I thought you might enjoy a couple of her most recent pictures. And, by the way, if you live in or around the Bay Area then you are lucky enough to either take Mah Jongg lessons from Toby or join in her Sunday Mah Jongg brunches and other Mah Jongg events.

TOBY ALWAYS MAKES ME SMILE…

I love receiving emails from my dear friend Toby Salk who lives in my once-upon-a-time home of Berkeley, CA. Her email photos always bring a smile and I thought you might enjoy a couple of her most recent pictures. And, by the way, if you live in or around the Bay Area then you are lucky enough to either take Mah Jongg lessons from Toby or join in her Sunday Mah Jongg brunches and other Mah Jongg events. 

And don’t forget about Toby’s big yard sale TODAY, July 22, 2017, from 10am – 2pm. Email me at ann@mahjonggandme.com for her address if you are interested in checking it out. 

A MYSTERIOUS MAH JONGG TILE FROM NEW YORK’S PAST…

From a February 24th, 2017 issue of MentalFloss by Erin Blakemore:
FOUR VIEWS OF THE TILE FOUND AT 103 ORCHARD, VIA LOWER EAST SIDE TENEMENT MUSEUM

People have found some weird things inside walls over the years, from mummified babies to outrageously rare artwork. Other times, remodeling projects reveal nothing but mouse carcasses or a bunch of dust. This mah-jongg tile, found inside the wall of a former tenement building in New York City, might not seem fascinating at first. But it has an interesting story to tell about the many waves of immigrants that surged into New York during the 20th century.

The piece was found during a historical restoration project inside 103 Orchard Street, a building on New York’s Lower East Side that is owned by the Tenement Museum. The tile emerged when workers sifted through the debris in the building’s third floor. Just one of many unexpected artifacts found inside the building’s walls, it’s an example of the kind of object historians love—a little slice of everyday life.

Though the address 103 Orchard has remained the same since the building was first constructed in 1888, the building and the neighborhood itself changed dramatically over the years. Around the time the building went up, the neighborhood was home to Italian and Jewish immigrants, followed by waves of Puerto Rican immigrants and then Chinese immigrants. Over the years, over 10,000 people lived inside the building’s 15 apartments, a testament to the flows of United States immigration in the 20th century.

You might think that the piece belonged to a family like the Wongs, Chinese Americans who lived in one of the apartments inside 103 Orchard starting in the late 1960s. But it could also have been owned by one of the Jewish families who lived inside the apartment building.

The mystery of the mah–jongg piece reflects the enigma of mah–jongg itself. It’s not exactly clear when the game was invented, or even how it’s properly spelled. (Merriam-Webster prefers mah-jongg.) What is certain is that after gaining popularity in China it came to the United States alongside Chinese immigrants in the 1920s. Despite harsh anti-Chinese laws that essentially banned Chinese immigration, many Chinese people risked deportation and came to the U.S. anyway, sporting false ID papers and, apparently, some mah–jongg sets.

As the game became more popular, it started to show up in department stores like Abercrombie & Fitch. The future purveyor of apparel for shirtless male models (which has been around since 1892) was the first U.S. company to offer the game, importing and selling over 40,000 sets in a single decade.

Fred Astaire and his sister Adele playing mah-jongg in 1926. Image credit: Getty Images

Mah–jongg also became a beloved game among Jewish women. For a while, the game was so popular that you could find mah-jongg books, magazines, clubs, and merchandise seemingly everywhere. Scholars believe that the game not only reflects globalization and immigration, but appealed to Jewish immigrant women as a way to build and keep social networks.

Though primarily played by wealthy and suburban Jewish women, it was popular enough that it very well could have been adopted in tenements, too. The days of mah-jongg–related movies and even ballets is long gone, but it’s actually become more popular in recent years, especially among younger Jewish women eager to learn the game their grandmas loved.

Whether the piece was owned by Chinese or Jewish immigrants, it shows how pastimes and traditions can cross-pollinate—and how a single building can contain remnants of multi-layered histories. And if you want to explore 103 Orchard for yourself, you’ll get a chance this summer, when the Tenement Museum opens a new exhibit there.

BECOME A MAH JONGG MASTER

Everyone’s dear friend and Mah Jongg maven, Gladys Grad, the Grand Master of American Style Mah Jongg, offers all of us the opportunity to become a Mah Jongg Grand Master. As she writes, “The MAH JONGG MASTER POINTS™ System certifies and authorizes tournament Hosts to run Mah Jongg games/ tournaments where MAH JONGG MASTER POINTS™ are awarded. Mah Jongg players can accumulate points and achieve ranks, by participating in these sanctioned tournaments where American-style Mah Jongg is played.”

Find American-Style Mah Jongg Tournaments near you – these tournaments are authorized to award Master Points: http://www.mahjonggmasterpoints.com/tournaments/

Use this form to sign up and become Mah Jongg Master Points® Member:  http://www.mahjonggmasterpoints.com/members/

For more information or any questions, contact Gladys at  http://www.mahjonggmasterpoints.com/contact-us/

STILL A MYSTERY BUT A BIT OF INFORMATION…

From our dear friend, Tony:

I have the same set from France, which I snapped up as a Buy It Now at a very reasonable price, as I’d never seen one like it before.
Like Mark, I’m not sure if this was produced before the Pung Chow factory was set up, or after it folded; either is possible… The box measures 290x155x90mm, made from finger-jointed wood stained red, with a slide top, a separator for the celluloid counting sticks cut-out to assist removal of the 4 trays solidly made from the same stained wood.
The gorgeous tiles measure 30x22x10mm with 45/55 white/red Pyralin (celluloid), sharp corner on top and rounded on the red – there is some colour variation on the red.
The designs are fairly standard; simple Circles, complex wan Craks, separated rod Bamboos, swooping crane Bambird.
There are a few tiles missing; 1-7 Cracks + 2 Craks; 1 Bamboo; 1 Red + 1 Green Dragon; no Flowers. I’m not sure if the flowers were deliberately omitted, emulating a Chinese set, or if they got lost.. but my friend Johni sent me pics of the Flowers if I ever try to re-create them..

Tony – thank you so much for chiming in…I KNEW you would have information on this gorgeous set!

TALK ABOUT A GREAT FIND!

I received an email from our friend Mark who had just scored big time with this amazing L.L. Haar set. I am drooling over this set and would give anything to own one like this! Check out these beautiful photos but first, I will tell you what Mark had to say about it…

I wanted to pass along some photos of an unusual set I purchased recently.  It came in a wooden box with a slip-in top.  There is a brass name plate with “Harr Products, Inc.”, so I’m assuming it was produced by L.L. Harr.  Mr. Harr also was responsible for Pung Chow sets, so why the different name, I’m not sure.  I have seen that Pung Chow went out of business in 1925, and Mr. Harr passed away in 1931, so I’m at a loss on when, where and why this manufacturer produced sets.
It is a two tone (Ivory white fronts and cherry red backs) set that appears to be a Pyralin-like material.  It has the flipping crane one bams that are common on Pung Chow sets, but the flowers are completely different.
I noticed your request for unusual set photos when researching the similarity between Coronet and Pung Chow graphics.  I’m sure you’re aware the flipping crane one bam and flowers are almost identical between the two, but I can’t seem to find out why.  If you have any information on this similarity, I’d love to hear.

If anyone knows the answer to Mark’s questions, please let us know! But for now, enjoy these photos!

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